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Go Back   REVscene Automotive Forum > Automotive Chat > The John Norwich Riders Corner

The John Norwich Riders Corner In honour of our fellow moderator: John Norwich R.I.P. September 17th, 2014
Buy, sell, trade bikes and gear, set up bike rallies, meet discussions. #revscenebikes

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Old 05-18-2010, 10:11 AM   #1
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First bike advice - found one

I'm looking to get into riding this year, after a couple years of consideration. Planning to take the course this summer.

After a deal of searching I found a bike, and just want to hear from other Revsceners their opinion on this as a first bike. I wanted to find something inexpensive to begin on, and am going to invest in proper gear.

It is a 1992 GSXR 750 with 57K. New tires and recent tune up.
Not a rebuilt but was lowsided once in its life at 60kph on dirt. All plastic parts replaced.
The owner was going to sign up for track days at pitt meadows and installed race rails to protect the body work while practicing in parking lots or w.h.y. He's selling to get a newer bike and is asking $2300obo.

I'm sure these threads get started all the time - please dont flame me, but direct me to some resources if I've missed some things about starting up. I have done research, but am still new to bikes.

Thanks for the help
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Old 05-18-2010, 10:57 AM   #2
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I dont think a 750cc is a wise choice for a first bike. Even a 600cc is borderline.

Have you set a budget for motorcycle training?
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Old 05-18-2010, 11:45 AM   #3
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I was hoping to find training for $1000 or under
Also found a 93 600 F2, perhaps that would be a more appropriate bike.
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Old 05-18-2010, 12:52 PM   #4
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where do you planning to take your course?

everyone here says Pacific Riding School but its really out of the way.
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Old 05-18-2010, 01:36 PM   #5
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I could not imagine starting on a supersport where you're leaned over. I really like my SV with the upright riding position, very easy to get used to.

My buddy started on a CBR and recently tried my bike and admits it was a much better first purchase - although his bike is faster and I am jealous.
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Old 05-18-2010, 02:02 PM   #6
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i'd say if you went to a school you'd be fine with a 600 as long as your mature enough in your head (not what you think you are but what other ppl think if your mature or not lol) although i don't know if i would buy one with 57k on it
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Old 05-18-2010, 02:17 PM   #7
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where do you planning to take your course?

everyone here says Pacific Riding School but its really out of the way.
I used to think that it was out of the way. Yes, it is. But the quality of training was totally worth the distance. Personally, after talking to some friends who took training elsewhere, their skill level in riding was not as good as I thought it would be. I would not want to ride with them to be onest.

I do not regret taking courses at PRS one bit. I paid $795 (inclusive of all taxes etc.) for the course and I finished it a month ago. It was either going to Surrey for training, or my life. My life is worth more than travelling to Surrey so I'll let you be the judge.

Edit: +1 to eurochevy. It's about maturity and knowing your personal limits and boundaries. Knowing where and when to draw the line. When you take the course, you start off with smaller bikes (250cc or so.) Once you're comfortable, you can try out a 600cc. I went from a 49cc, to a 200cc, 250cc, and most recently a 500cc. I don't think I could have gone the other way around.
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Old 05-18-2010, 04:53 PM   #8
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I'm personally happy that I started with a 250 (was looking at 600's mostly). Its not the day to day riding thats the issue its if you need to make a quick decision.
On a sportbike if you need to stop quick you'll likely end up over the handlebars or if you dont have a perfect feel for throttle control and bodypositioning and roll the throttle on slightly too hard you end up in the ditch, highsiding, or overshooting your corner (potentially into the oncoming lane). I'm not saying that will happen, but theres the distinct possibility
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Old 05-18-2010, 05:01 PM   #9
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Make sure you find a bike that fits you height. Preferably a bike where you dont have to tippy toe. If a bike is too high for you, it may cause a few problems.
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whole time i thought gh0strider was white lol

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Old 05-18-2010, 09:50 PM   #10
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Judging by the fact its a 92 gsxr750, your looking at about an equivalant of an early model Honda f4i, power wise that is. The technology in sportbikes has dramatically improved in the last decade, that something like a 92 750 is nothing compared to sportbikes of the last 5-6 yrs. If you have any type of motorcycle background, say dirtbiking, something like this shouldn't be a problem for you. However, if you are a complete noob, starting off in a 250 - 500cc is probably better. You are on the right track with starting with a very inexpensive bike and good gear. Which btw, if you are looking for quality gear, pm me and I'll see what I can do for you.

One other thing, you said he installed race rails? Like the ones stunters use? Man, I would take those off in an instant if at the track!
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Old 05-22-2010, 12:32 AM   #11
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took the course at PRS last feb never rode a motorcycle before bought my full gear before i bought my first bike an 03 f4i lovin every minute of it and now im workin on dragging my knee at the parking lot...some people wud say its not a good idea to start on 600 yes its true but it depends on how ull be riding(attitude) it coz either way when u crash on a 250 is almost the same crashing on a 600 juz have discipline and take it slow last thing u wanna do is rush then thats how u gon hurt urself...take the course ud learn a lot from it oh and make sure go put on some gear...

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Old 05-22-2010, 09:47 AM   #12
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it's true if you crash on a 250 is the same on a 600 but the 250 is a lot more forgiving then a 600
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Old 05-22-2010, 05:48 PM   #13
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^ agreed
As I was saying before, the throttle is much snappier and responsive and more eager to get you into a heap of trouble on a supersport, and ditto for the brakes
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Old 05-30-2010, 09:32 PM   #14
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Well i started riding about a year ago but it was few and far between, this season i picked up riding.

My first bike was/is a 87 FZR400. Ill be honest with you, im still learning, and ill admit i still have quite a bit to learn, i had minimal dirt bike experience so really i learned on a "sport bike." I personally cant imagine people learning on R6/CBR600RR/gsxr600's!

I ride my friends R6 a bit, and that bike still amazes me at how much of a difference 200CC and technology makes. Bike is fast, i cant imagine riding a new liter bike. Im actually looking for a new bike, mostly at CBR600 f4i. Atleast now i have some experience under my belt so im not a total noob.

In my opinion for learning, id start with something around 400-500CC. Even on my 400 the lack of low end torque is annoying, its hard to ride at 50kmh because in 2nd the revs are to high and its kinda snappy and in 3rd its too low and has no balls. Atleast on a 500 the lack of torque is not bad so it makes riding around town a little easier. Some bikes make a lot better low end torque than others so id try to find one that does as a first bike. Top end power is not something you should be concerned about learning anyways.
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Old 05-30-2010, 09:48 PM   #15
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dont listen to anyone..go with fastest bike possible..

thats how i learned..practice practice practice

school is a big ripoff they charge 800 to get a licsence
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Old 05-30-2010, 11:20 PM   #16
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took the course at PRS last feb never rode a motorcycle before bought my full gear before i bought my first bike an 03 f4i lovin every minute of it and now im workin on dragging my knee at the parking lot...some people wud say its not a good idea to start on 600 yes its true but it depends on how ull be riding(attitude) it coz either way when u crash on a 250 is almost the same crashing on a 600 juz have discipline and take it slow last thing u wanna do is rush then thats how u gon hurt urself...take the course ud learn a lot from it oh and make sure go put on some gear...
Markus, is that you?
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Old 05-30-2010, 11:44 PM   #17
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school is a big ripoff they charge 800 to get a licsence
Its $800 to learn the skill, awareness and knowledge of riding as safe as possible and keeping your life. If you think they charge $800 to help you get a license you're a tool.
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:17 PM   #18
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Markus, is that you?
yeah dude...is this will???i see u got an rr now huh?
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Old 05-31-2010, 11:20 PM   #19
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Its $800 to learn the skill, awareness and knowledge of riding as safe as possible and keeping your life. If you think they charge $800 to help you get a license you're a tool.
k3lv is absolutely right

i took the PRS course and the 800 dollars was WELL SPENT. they teach you many survival skills on todays ever increasingly dangerous roads. they also take you on a few road trips with the class after you do your theory and parking lot training. WELL WORTH IT. I am doing my class 6 roadtest tmrw and i have NEVER felt this confident about a roadtest before. I have not mentioned that i do not own a motorcycle and that i have no been on a bike for the last month.
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Old 06-01-2010, 02:32 AM   #20
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Good luck!
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Old 06-26-2010, 07:36 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Powerslide View Post
I'm looking to get into riding this year, after a couple years of consideration. Planning to take the course this summer.

After a deal of searching I found a bike, and just want to hear from other Revsceners their opinion on this as a first bike. I wanted to find something inexpensive to begin on, and am going to invest in proper gear.

It is a 1992 GSXR 750 with 57K. New tires and recent tune up.
Not a rebuilt but was lowsided once in its life at 60kph on dirt. All plastic parts replaced.
The owner was going to sign up for track days at pitt meadows and installed race rails to protect the body work while practicing in parking lots or w.h.y. He's selling to get a newer bike and is asking $2300obo.

I'm sure these threads get started all the time - please dont flame me, but direct me to some resources if I've missed some things about starting up. I have done research, but am still new to bikes.

Thanks for the help
You're height and weight?

You wanna keep in mind the bigger the bike the heavier, and if you're going in to sports bike, the bigger bikes have very strenuous leaned position.


I personally would not recommend anything over 600cc to anyone who isn't physically fit or mature.

Bigger sport bikes get any where from 400-500+ lbs where as the 600cc's are in their mid 300s. That 100lbs makes a huge difference.

You got to think about whether or not you can pick up your 450lbs bike after u lay it down or w/e.

How about walking your bike with just the handle bars? Think about the weight you have to fight against constantly pushing over you.

Start on 250 move your way up, 400 > 500 etc. 250 is plenty enough power for most new riders to have fun and can take it way past speed limit on any north American Highway.

The amount of power the 600cc + bikes put out is enough to get most in trouble.

Imagine this scenario, if you hesitated and accidentally squeeze the throttle too much comin out of a corner and u get a "tank slapper". GG.

Especially for new riders who aren't familiar with bikes, or the things that can happen to you while riding. Reading about it, and going to school and hearing about it is one thing, actually experiencing it is something else completely. Most new rider's natural instinct is to grip the bars too firmly or accidentally squeeze the throttle from a nervous reaction etc. Then what happens? You can imagine....

Start with a small bike, it gives you a taste of what you're getting your self into... and you have less chance of laying down a bike doing low speed maneuvers.

A lot of noobs who take their 750 - litre bikes off the dealership first time crash and get killed on the first ride home within couple blocks.


m2c, coming from a 135lbs 750cc rider.

cheers,
Happy safe riding. "Don't end up a statistic"
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Old 06-26-2010, 05:38 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recoil View Post
You're height and weight?

You wanna keep in mind the bigger the bike the heavier, and if you're going in to sports bike, the bigger bikes have very strenuous leaned position.


I personally would not recommend anything over 600cc to anyone who isn't physically fit or mature.

Bigger sport bikes get any where from 400-500+ lbs where as the 600cc's are in their mid 300s. That 100lbs makes a huge difference.

You got to think about whether or not you can pick up your 450lbs bike after u lay it down or w/e.

How about walking your bike with just the handle bars? Think about the weight you have to fight against constantly pushing over you.

Start on 250 move your way up, 400 > 500 etc. 250 is plenty enough power for most new riders to have fun and can take it way past speed limit on any north American Highway.

The amount of power the 600cc + bikes put out is enough to get most in trouble.

Imagine this scenario, if you hesitated and accidentally squeeze the throttle too much comin out of a corner and u get a "tank slapper". GG.

Especially for new riders who aren't familiar with bikes, or the things that can happen to you while riding. Reading about it, and going to school and hearing about it is one thing, actually experiencing it is something else completely. Most new rider's natural instinct is to grip the bars too firmly or accidentally squeeze the throttle from a nervous reaction etc. Then what happens? You can imagine....

Start with a small bike, it gives you a taste of what you're getting your self into... and you have less chance of laying down a bike doing low speed maneuvers.

A lot of noobs who take their 750 - litre bikes off the dealership first time crash and get killed on the first ride home within couple blocks.


m2c, coming from a 135lbs 750cc rider.

cheers,
Happy safe riding. "Don't end up a statistic"


i didn't know delivering pizzas in your miata could get you a 750 =/

m2c, coming from a 165lbs 750cc rider

Last edited by CharlieH; 06-26-2010 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 06-26-2010, 05:38 PM   #23
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Bigger sport bikes get any where from 400-500+ lbs where as the 600cc's are in their mid 300s. That 100lbs makes a huge difference.

You got to think about whether or not you can pick up your 450lbs bike after u lay it down or w/e.
The dry weight between most 600's and 1 liter's are only 20lbs different

m2c, coming from a 150lbs 750cc rider
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Old 06-26-2010, 05:40 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recoil View Post
You're height and weight?

You wanna keep in mind the bigger the bike the heavier, and if you're going in to sports bike, the bigger bikes have very strenuous leaned position.


I personally would not recommend anything over 600cc to anyone who isn't physically fit or mature.

Bigger sport bikes get any where from 400-500+ lbs where as the 600cc's are in their mid 300s. That 100lbs makes a huge difference.

You got to think about whether or not you can pick up your 450lbs bike after u lay it down or w/e.

How about walking your bike with just the handle bars? Think about the weight you have to fight against constantly pushing over you.

Start on 250 move your way up, 400 > 500 etc. 250 is plenty enough power for most new riders to have fun and can take it way past speed limit on any north American Highway.

The amount of power the 600cc + bikes put out is enough to get most in trouble.

Imagine this scenario, if you hesitated and accidentally squeeze the throttle too much comin out of a corner and u get a "tank slapper". GG.

Especially for new riders who aren't familiar with bikes, or the things that can happen to you while riding. Reading about it, and going to school and hearing about it is one thing, actually experiencing it is something else completely. Most new rider's natural instinct is to grip the bars too firmly or accidentally squeeze the throttle from a nervous reaction etc. Then what happens? You can imagine....

Start with a small bike, it gives you a taste of what you're getting your self into... and you have less chance of laying down a bike doing low speed maneuvers.

A lot of noobs who take their 750 - litre bikes off the dealership first time crash and get killed on the first ride home within couple blocks.


m2c, coming from a 135lbs 750cc rider.

cheers,
Happy safe riding. "Don't end up a statistic"
since when do u have a 750? lol

OP: btw 750 is fine, that price is kinda pricey for that year tho, 95% of riders i know started on 600/750s


m2c, coming from a 200lbs 750cc rider

Last edited by Krome1; 06-26-2010 at 05:51 PM.
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Old 06-26-2010, 05:43 PM   #25
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A lot of noobs who take their 750 - litre bikes off the dealership first time crash and get killed on the first ride home within couple blocks.
LOLWUT? proof?
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